Why You Should Spay Neuter Your Pet

The decision to spay or neuter your pet is an important one for pet owners. It can be the single best decision you make for their long-term welfare.

[dt_highlight color=”” text_color=”” bg_color=””]Reduce pet homelessness[/dt_highlight]

In every community, in every state, there are homeless animals. In the U.S., there are an estimated 6-8 million homeless animals entering animal shelters every year. Barely half of these animals are adopted. Tragically, the rest are euthanized. These are healthy, sweet pets who would have made great companions.

[dt_highlight color=”” text_color=”” bg_color=””]Your pet’s health[/dt_highlight]

According to the report of of spaying/neutering, neutered male dogs live 18% longer than un-neutered male dogs and spayed female dogs live 23% longer than unspayed female dogs. Part of the reduced lifespan of unaltered pets can be attributed to their increased urge to roam, exposing them to fights with other animals, getting struck by cars and other mishaps.

Getting your pets spayed/neutered will not change their fundamental personality, like their protective instinct.

[dt_highlight color=”” text_color=”” bg_color=””]Curb bad behavior[/dt_highlight]

Unneutered dogs are much more assertive and prone to urine-marking (lifting their leg) than neutered dogs. Although it is most often associated with male dogs, females may do it, too. Spaying or neutering your dog should reduce urine-marking and may stop it altogether.

For cats, the urge to spray is extremely strong in an intact cat, and the simplest solution is to get yours neutered or spayed by 4 months of age before there’s even a problem. Neutering solves 90 percent of all marking issues, even in cats that have been doing it for a while. It can also minimize howling, the urge to roam and fighting with other males.

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